Tag Archives: kindness

A Touch of Kindness Goes a Long Way

Operation Spread Hope, Love & Joy, Part III

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“A little spark of kindness can put a colossal burst of sunshine in someone’s day. Be the reason someone smiles today.

Point to Ponder:
Have you ever considered your daily goal being to make someone smile?

iGnite Neissa

by Neissa Brown Springmann

Like many little boys, when my four year old son Durant was a toddler he loved trash trucks. Thursday was our trash pick-up day so that was a huge deal! As soon as I heard the trash truck roaring down the street my husband or I would scoop him up and we’d rush out of the house to catch a glimpse and give a wave. He loved trash trucks so much that I would follow them around neighborhoods. During one of my “I’ll do anything to entertain my toddler”/ “trash truck stalking” moments, I was following a trash truck so close that the sweet garbage man got out of his truck to wave me around him. I let him know that I had a little boy in the car who loved trash trucks. He then invited us into his truck and let Durant push buttons and steer the wheel. Like the quote says, the little spark of kindness from the garbage man put a colossal burst of sunshine in both of our days! I will forever be grateful for all of the sweet garbage men who honked their horns, gave us waves and let us check out their powerful machines.

Before having my endearing garbage man experience which led to a sincere appreciation for this group, my angelic grandmother showed me how important it was to be kind and generous to people who have “thankless jobs”, like a garbage man.

My grandmother, ‘Mama Doris’, might have been the most kind and wonderful person I have ever known. If being too kind is possible, she fell in that category because she nurtured and cared for everyone except herself. In addition to doing anything for anyone and being an amazing grandmother, a few examples of her kindness were that she would regularly bake the mailman and garbage man her homemade apple and butter pies, and she would scramble eggs for stray cats! She was always spreading hope, love and joy and I have no doubt that she is in heaven continuing to bake and cook for everyone.

In consideration of this week being our third week of Operation Spread Hope, Love and Joy, my encouragement for you is to continue to be intentional with spreading hope, love and joy by doing something kind for men and/or women who perform “thankless jobs”. Just a few examples of thankless jobs are garbage, mail and delivery services, construction, etc.

Finally, due to travel back to Austin for the holidays we will miss this week’s trash day, so last week I left a Merry Christmas note with goodie gift bag for our trash men. I don’t know about you, but our pantry is never lacking treats, especially during the holiday season, so it was a cinch to find goodies to fill the bag. And, it felt really good to create and leave a gift bag for our garbage men and upon doing so I had no expectation. However, that evening while pulling the garbage cans back into the garage I found a hand-written thank you note from Jaime V, one of the garbage men (see below). I was floored!

While last Tuesday was a great day, Jaime V’s note was the highlight of that day and it continues to make me smile. In fact, I’m keeping it in my day planner as a reminder of not only how truly gratifying it is to give, but how upligting it feels to receive an unexpected thank you.

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A thank you not from Jaime V, our garbage truck driver

 

Action Item:
Spread a little love, hope and joy by doing something kind for the men and/or women who perform thankless jobs such as garbage, mail and delivery services, construction, etc.

 

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Spreading Hope, Love and Joy to the Hopeless

Operation Spread Hope, Love & Joy, Part II

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Point to Ponder:
How do you view the homeless or those on the street asking for help?

iGnite Neissa

by Neissa Brown Springmann

Sadly, in Austin and in most cities it is common to see homeless, desperate or hopeless people standing at busy intersections asking for help. Despite being advised by law officials and professionals to not give them money, if I have cash, change or any unopened food I always give what I have. And, when I do not have anything to give I get embarrassed and avoid eye contact. Ugh! Definitely not a mature and or compassionate response! I realize that by giving money I could be enabling their pursuit of getting a job or supplying funds for their next possible drug fix, but I don’t know their life story or history so to judge seems wrong and unfair.

Shamefully, there was a time when I didn’t feel this way and my heart was filled with judgement. While I didn’t voice it, when I saw someone asking for help my thought was that they should have more pride and work ethic than to lazily ask for my hard earned money. After all, I grew up with limited financial resources yet managed to work my way through college and make it. Why can’t they? However, several years ago I attended a Caritas luncheon where the co-authors of the book, Same Kind of Different as Me spoke. This experience changed my heart and perspective.

If you haven’t read the book, I encourage you to. Or if you wait until April 2016 it will be out in the theaters. In summary, through volunteering at a homeless meals program in Fort Worth, the co-authors Ron Hall (a wealthy Fort Worth art dealer) and Denver Moore (a literal modern-day hobo) developed a unique friendship. An intense bond was formed and both lives were changed– with Ron’s heart experiencing the greatest transformation. As a result of the book’s message and success, the two men traveled to speaking engagements, with Austin being one of them. Towards the end of the luncheon, Denver, the modern-day hobo and former prison inmate spoke. While he had no formal education, he understood life, the spiritual world, and had a connection with God like I had never seen or heard before. The room was silenced by his compassion, faith and wisdom and while I clung to every word he spoke, it was his advice on whether or not to give the homeless and hopeless money that I will never forget.

Having lived a life of homelessness, desperation and having people look down on him, Denver passionately urged the audience to bypass judgement towards the homeless, as we will never know what they have experienced in life and why they are in the situation they are in. Furthermore, he acknowledged that we’ve all been told not to give the homeless money, however he pleaded that we give what we can, and in doing so respectfully look them in their eyes and smile. Ultimately, he reminded us that we will never know if it will be our dollar, our smile or our words that will be the difference in their life.

After his sincere message, rather than look down on the homeless or beggars, I began to view them, their situation, and people in general with more compassion. I contemplated how I would want someone to treat me, my children, my family, and friends if we where homeless, desperate or falling on hopeless times. Or, if we were just in need of some help, support or encouragement. In doing so I realized how self-righteous and judgemental I had been. Then recently it was upon reading Matthew 26: 34 – 45, verses that I have listened to many times before, that I finally heard and realized how much more I can and need to do:

On His right, he will say; (Jesus) Come here, you beloved, you people whom My Father has blessed. Claim your inheritance, the Kingdom prepared for you from the beginning of creation. You shall be richly rewarded, for when I was hungry, you fed Me. And when I was thirsty, you gave Me something to drink; I was alone as a stranger, and you welcomed Me into your homes and into your lives; I was naked, and you gave Me clothes to wear; I was sick, and you tended to My needs; I was in prison, and you comforted Me.
Even then the righteous will not have achieved perfect understanding and will not recall these things.
Righteous: Master, when did we find You hungry and give You food? When did we find You thirsty and slake Your thirst? When did we find You a stranger and welcome You in, or find you naked and clothe You? When did we find You sick and nurse You to health? When did we visit You when You were in prison?
Jesus: I tell you this: whenever you saw a brother or sister hungry or cold, whatever you did to the least of these, so you did to Me.
And then He will turn to those on His left hand.
Jesus: Get away from Me, for I was starving, and you left Me with no food. I was dry and thirsty, you left Me to struggle with nothing to drink. When I was alone as a stranger, you turned away from Me. When I was pitifully naked, you left Me unclothed. When I was sick, you gave Me no care. When I was in prison, you did not comfort Me.
Unrighteous: Master, when did we see You hungry and thirsty? When did we see You friendless or homeless or excluded? When did we see you without clothes? When did we see You sick or in jail? When did we see You in distress and fail to respond?
Jesus: I tell you this: whenever you saw a brother hungry or cold, when you saw a sister weak and without friends, when you saw the least of these and ignored their suffering, so you ignored Me.

Despite your faith or belief, the idea that we should treat others as we would want to be treated says it all. And, we have all been given a conscious that guides us and gives us valuable information, which is why I am unable to make eye contact when someone is asking for help and I don’t have anything to give them. I know it’s not right or respectful to not show someone respect and give them the dignity they deserve by simply looking in their eye and exchanging a smile.

As a result, several months ago I began creating baggies of crackers, rice crispy treats, and breakfast bars. And, as of last week I added our printable ‘iGnite spread hope love and joy’ note cards. I keep the bags in my car so that I can have them with me at all times and it truly has made a difference! Therefore, as we continue to focus on spreading hope, love and joy, I hope you will consider doing the same and making care packages that you can hand out when needed. While the person you give the goodie bag and smile to will appreciate your generosity, I promise that your heart will be the one filled with hope, love and joy.

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Goodie Bag Basket

Action Item:
Create goodies bags and fill them with helpful items and the printable iGnite note cards. Keep them in your car and with a smile and eye contact, hand them to the homeless, hopeless or someone in need.

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Arm Yourself with the Best

iGnite team

The iGnite team during our 2015 summer boat outing

Point to Ponder:
Are the five people you spend the most time with causing you to give up on your dreams, or do they nurture your dreams and your life?

“If we surround ourselves with people who are successful, who are forward-moving, who are positive, who are focused on producing results, who will support us, it will challenge us to be more, do more and share more. If you surround yourself with people who will never let you settle for less than you can be, you have the greatest gift that anyone can hope for.”
– Anthony Robbins

by Neissa Brown Springmann

by Neissa Brown Springmann

It was just over nine years ago that my short, yet colorful life journey began making sense. All of the “who, why, and what for” puzzle pieces created a vivid and crystal clear picture of my purpose, which is when I created iGnite. The process wasn’t sophisticated nor predictable. Rather, it consisted of a few meetings with a dear friend and mentor at Starbucks where I revealed my heart’s desire and vision, coupled with challenging questions and critical thinking. Within a few weeks I answered his tough questions, though my business brainchild remained nameless. We both recognized that the name had to be something I loved, and that conveyed an inspirational, energetic and timeless message. As we tossed around different ideas he said, “it sounds like you want to ignite their lives!” “YES!”, I shouted. He smiled, I wrote it down, and the rest is history.

I love to share and reminisce about that story simply because of its spontaneous nature. There are also many more stories like this, all of which have provided me with unforeseeable lessons and growth opportunities over the past nine years. One of the most important pieces of advice that has provided me with the most personal and professional value, is “Be intentional with whom you surround yourself with, and arm yourself with the best.”

iGnite began the first Monday in October of 2006, and by February I had hired a professional business coach, Michelle Ewalt, who I worked with for three years. She was aware of all of my thoughts, plans, and ideas for iGnite, which for a one-woman show was a giant feat. She also knew that Russell and I wanted to have children one day, so during a meeting she suggested I spend my time determining the five, non-negotiable characteristics I wanted in an iGnite leader. I explained that I wasn’t interested in sharing this business with anyone else, simply because I couldn’t imagine another person loving and caring for our members and aligning with the vision as I did. But what she knew that I didn’t know at the time was this; “no branch can bear fruit by itself, it must remain on the vine.” (John 15:4). I realize this verse has much greater meaning beyond my situation, but Michelle knew that on my own, the mission would not be fruitful. She also knew that if I wanted to see my personal goals come true, like having a family, forming a team was essential. And so, that exact day I identified and wrote down the five, non-negotiable characteristics of an iGnite team member. Within one year, the inspiring and wonderful women began appearing, and continue to, which currently make up what I think is the most beautiful, talented and special team in all of Austin and beyond. As a result, our membership is a mirror-image of our team, making up a spectacular community of love, health and kindness. The fruit is rich and we are blessed!

One of the unforeseeable lessons I learned is that in order for me to give my gift, which is the ability to personally and professionally give and be the best Neissa and pursue my dreams and passions, it can’t happen alone, and I must arm myself with the best. Per the words of the late world class track athlete Steve Prefontaine, “to give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the gift.” I’ve decided that I don’t want to sacrifice my gift, and so with intention I not only arm myself with those who are the best at what they do (both personally and professionally), but I also arm myself with people who are better than me (personally and professionally) so I can up my game, grow, and become my best. As the late Jim Rohn says, “we are the average of the five people we spend the most time with.”

This week I invite you to be intentional with me and arm yourself with the best so you don’t sacrifice your gift. And, so we can be our best, we must constantly be evaluating and asking ourselves the following questions from Jim Rohn: “Who am I around? What are they doing to me? What have they got me reading? What have they got me saying? Where do they have me going? What do they have me thinking? And most important, what do they have me becoming? Then ask yourself the big question. Is that okay? Life does not get better by chance. It gets better by change.”

Action Item:
Make a short list of the five characteristics of the people you want and need in your life that can help you become your best.

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Always Aim to Surprise & Delight

“Lead the life that will make you kindly and friendly to everyone about you, and you will be surprised what a happy life you will lead.”
– Charles M. Schwab

Point to Ponder:
How would your daily interactions change if your aim was to surprise and delight everyone whose path you cross?

Action Item:
Adopt ‘the Disney mentality’ by treating everyone (no exceptions) with kindness, as if they are your guest.

by Neissa Brown Springmann

by Neissa Brown Springmann

If you live in Austin or pay a penny’s worth of attention to sports, you know that The University of Texas has a new athletic director, Steve Patterson. How this relates to my world is that my husband Russell is one of the assistant men’s basketball coaches. As anyone would expect, with new leadership comes change, new ideas and new expectations — all of which intrigue me because I’m a sucker for anything that applies to leadership, improving customer experience, relationships and bettering one’s personal and professional life.

One recent brilliant meeting the athletic department was required to attend was led by The Disney Institute. I think it’s safe to suggest that there’s not a person reading this journal who isn’t familiar with Disney and their superior products and excellent service. If you are a parent of small children like myself, Disney is my best friend friend and my worst nightmare. Their movies create an amazing experience and enhance my children’s imaginations, but the flip side is that my once charming and semi-sophisticated home has been taken over by Disney characters. Needless to say, they run an exceptional operation and I was ecstatic to learn the teaching points from the best in the world.

Upon picking Russell’s brain, he also shared the handbook and the impressive collection of notes. It’s difficult to say which philosophy or expectation is most important, however the one that resonated most with me is this:

Disney strives to surprise and delight their customers and one another, their co-workers. Regardless of business hierarchy, from the CEO to the custodians, they treat everyone as their guest. They always go the extra mile to ensure that everyone has a supreme experience.

I love that! I think it makes the most sense of any professional advice I’ve ever read or received… but what if we took it one step further? What if we applied this rule to our personal lives too? What if we treated our family members as guests and made it our daily mission to surprise and delight them, everyday? Confession: I know Russell would be beyond grateful if I treated him this way. And, to go another step, what if we treated everyone — including total strangers — as our guests? Can you imagine driving in awful Austin traffic and kindly motioning another driver who is trying to cut in front of you that he/she is welcome to slip in? I think we should try!

I really do think this Disney philosophy is the best and most practical life wisdom there is. I have no doubt that if we applied it to our personal and professional lives it would repair relationships and set us up for success in all areas of our life. I can for sure predict that life we would feel less stressful, we’d be happier, and the result would be improved health and quality of life.

Believe it or not, September is “Self-Improvement Month,” so each week we will discuss different ways we can all improve our lives. This week’s recommendation is adopting “the Disney mentality” and treating everyone (no exceptions) with kindness, like they are our guest. I have a strange suspicion that our efforts in “surprising and delighting” will lead to more personal fulfillment than anything else. It will be an exciting experiment with life-changing results, which we hope you’ll share with friends and even on social media.

For additional inspiration, check out this three minute video to see how one act of kindness by an eight year old is changing lives:

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Creating Your Ripple Effect

Rain Drop Ripples

Our lives are not determined by what happens to us but by how we react to what happens, not by what life brings to us, but by the attitude we bring to life. A positive attitude causes a chain reaction of positive thoughts, events, and outcomes. It is a catalyst, a spark that creates extraordinary results.
– Unknown

Last week I had the fortunate opportunity of having dinner with a very dear friend whom I have tremendous respect for. Unfortunately, we are in different chapters of our lives, making it difficult to connect. However, when we are able to spend time with one another, our conversations are rich, candid and I inevitably leave feeling more centered, wise and filled with an uplifting breath of fresh air.

During dinner, our impromptu topic was energy — about how the energy we give is directly proportional to the energy we receive. Basically, energy out = energy in, and while I know this to be true, it reinforced that having a consistent positive attitude, avoiding gossip, negativity and treating all people with kindness, patience and love has infinite power. In fact, our attitude (positive or negative), thoughts, actions and words have a ripple effect  — like the ever expanding ripples across water when an object is dropped into it — that can either add value to or take value away from our lives and each and every life around us. Pastor Charles Swindoll says it best:

The longer I live, the more I realize the impact of attitude on life.

Attitude, to me, is more important than facts. It is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than failures, than successes, than what other people think or say or do. It is more important than appearance, giftedness or skill. It will make or break a company… a church… a home.

The remarkable thing is we have a choice every day regarding the attitude we will embrace for that day. We cannot change our past… we cannot change the fact that people will act in a certain way. We cannot change the inevitable. The only thing we can do is play on the one string we have, and that is our attitude… I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it.

And so it is with you… we are in charge of our attitudes.

I believe that creating the healthy and happy life of our dreams is as simple as our attitude and the ripple effect we create. What we all have to determine is whether or not our ripple effect is working for or against us.

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Point To Ponder:
Is your attitude attracting positive relationships and energy or is it creating a perpetual cycle of exhausting drama?

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Action Item:
Determine the areas of your life where you’d like to see improvement, then decide how you can make changes to your attitude so it creates a ripple effect of positive and life-giving energy.

To Your Health,

Neissa

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Building Bridges

Building Bridges

Constant kindness can accomplish much. As the sun makes ice melt, kindness causes misunderstanding, mistrust and hostility to evaporate.
-Albert Schweitzer (1875 – 1965)

As you have likely noticed, I am most inspired by people and quotes. I am in constant pursuit of actions and words that cause me to think outside of my box and challenge me to be a better person.

Fortunately, my husband recently told me about a beautiful poem called The Bridge Builder. It not only speaks to the season, but also to our regular and daily lives, as our actions, words, body language, and tones are either building or burning bridges. We have control of our lives and get to determine how we use our time, talents and treasures to make a positive difference for another person.

The poem is below and I hope it impacts you as much as it has impacted me.

An old man, going a lone highway,
Came at the evening cold and gray
To a chasm vast and deep and wide
Through which was flowing a sullen tide.
The old man crossed in the twilight dim;
The rapids held no fears for him.
But he turned when safe on the other side
And built a bridge to span the tide.

“Old man,” cried a fellow pilgrim near,
“You’re wasting your time in building here.
Your journey will end with the closing day;
You never again will pass this way.
You have crossed the chasm deep and wide;
Why build you this bridge at even-tide?”

The builder lifted his old gray head.
“Good friend, in the path I have come,” he said,
“There follows after me today
A youth whose feet must pass this way.
This stream, which has been as naught to me,
To that fair youth may a pitfall be.
He too must cross in the twilight dim —
Good friend, I am building this bridge for him.”

-Will Allen Dromgoole (1860- 1934)

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Point To Ponder:
Is your life and energy being used on building bridges of kindness?

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Action Item:
Live your life in a way that makes the future better and brighter for someone else.

To your health,

Neissa

About Neissa

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The Benefits of Helping Others

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It is the greatest of all mistakes to do nothing because you can only do little – do what you can.
— George Washington Carver

Action:
Enjoy a week of creative thinking and embrace all of the ways you can help others. From a prayer, kind gesture, volunteering or a donation, it all counts and always impacts a life.

by Neissa Springmann

by Neissa Springmann

What an extraordinary summer and week the state of Texas and Central Texas has experienced?! With wildfires blazing all around and thousands of our neighbors left without homes, it has been a surreal week leaving each of us asking, “How can I help?” Additionally, with today marking the tenth anniversary of 9/11, I have spent a large portion of the morning watching the memorials in New York City, Washington DC and Pennsylvania. The memories take me back to the day it all happened, when we all wondered “How can I help?”

I believe we are all created with an innate desire to help others, but if you’re like me I have a tendency to complicate the act of helping. For example, one of my lofty dreams is to go on a mission trip to Africa. I’ve talked to my husband Russell about this many times and “Mr. Practical” always says the same thing, “I think that’s a great dream, but why do you have to go to Africa when there are people in Austin that need your help now??” Ugh! Of course he’s right, but I love THINKING BIG, and because I love thinking big I want to help big too… And, because I’m a big thinker and want to help big, I get fixated on the BIG and unfortunately end up doing nothing.

This type of thinking reminds me of setting goals and dreams. Oftentimes when setting big goals and dreams, my brain gets overwhelmed by the enormity. Instead of taking bite size and practical steps that will allow me to get closer to them becoming a reality, I get paralyzed and end up taking no action at all. Watch the video below if you need a little inspiration or reminder of why we should never let go of our innate desire to help others.

As for helping others, just imagine the outcome if every person in the United Stated donated $1.00 to the Bastrop fire victims? If this were the case, the total would be over THREE HUNDRED MILLION DOLLARS! I don’t know what the estimated damage in Bastrop is but I have a feeling that would help! I can only speak for myself, but I can find $1.00 of change in my purse, so why is it that when I think of donating $1.00, I often times pass up the opportunity? It is simply because I think it’s not enough. However, the truth is when my $1.00 is combined with other contributions, the total number quickly adds up.

Helping others certainly doesn’t have to come in monetary forms only. A prayer, kind gesture, volunteering once a year, donating 50 cents, clothes and non-perishables all add up and make a difference in a life. Furthermore and selfishly, when I help someone, my spirit is iGnited! Naturally, I am always humbled, however my level of gratitude for life exponentially increases and I feel enthusiastic about helping more!!

Finally, regardless of the way you can help, this week I encourage you to consider the “H” in Enthusiastic Living. Not only will you help someone, you’ll also be helping yourself! Below is a fascinating article from giftsofkindness.com which explains the multiple benefits of helping others, along with what happens when you add just one degree (action) to your life or to someone else’s. It’s all GOOD stuff!

How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving, and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in your life you will have been all of these.
— Sydney Smith

Being kind has a profound impact in the lives of others, but you may not know how much of a positive health benefit it delivers to you as well. People who perform acts of kindness would agree that being kind to someone else makes them “feel good.” Scientific research shows that it not only can make you feel good but being kind has a significant health benefit, both physically and mentally.

Allan Luks, the former executive director of the Institute for the Advancement of Health and executive director of Big Brothers/Big Sisters of New York City studied kindness and documents his findings in his book, The Healing Power of Doing Good: The Health and Spiritual Benefits of Helping Others.

Luks’ study involved more than 3,000 volunteers of all ages at more than 20 organizations throughout the country. He sent a 17-question survey to these volunteers, asking them how they felt when they did a kind act. A total of 3,296 surveys were returned to Luks, and after a computerized analysis, he saw a clear cause-and-effect relationship between helping and good health. Luks’ concluded, “Helping contributes to the maintenance of good health, and it can diminish the effect of diseases and disorders both serious and minor, psychological and physical.”

Below are a few of Luk’s significant findings as a result of his research. We hope this research not only excites you but also encourages you to share the gift of kindness daily!

  • Helping others contributes to the maintenance of good health, and it can diminish the effect of diseases and disorders serious and minor, psychological and physical.
  • A rush of euphoria, followed by a longer period of calm, after performing a kind act is often referred to as a “helper’s high,” involving physical sensations and the release of the body’s natural painkillers, the endorphins. This initial rush is then followed by a longer-lasting period of improved emotional well- being.
  • Stress-related health problems improve after performing kind acts. Helping reverses feelings of depression, supplies social contact, and decreases feelings of hostility and isolation that can cause stress, overeating, ulcers, etc. A drop in stress may, for some people, decrease the constriction within the lungs that leads to asthma attacks.
  • Helping can enhance our feelings of joyfulness, emotional resilience, and vigor, and can reduce the unhealthy sense of isolation.
  • A decrease in both the intensity and the awareness of physical pain can occur.
  • The incidence of attitudes, such as chronic hostility, that negatively arouse and damage the body is reduced.
  • The health benefits and sense of well-being return for hours or even days whenever the helping act is remembered.
  • An increased sense of self-worth, greater happiness, and optimism, as well as a decrease in feelings of helplessness and depression, is achieved.
  • Once we establish an “affiliative connection” with someone – a relationship of friendship, love, or some sort of positive bonding – we feel emotions that can strengthen the immune system.
  • The practice of caring for strangers translates to immense immune and healing benefits.
  • Regular club attendance, volunteering, entertaining, or faith group attendance is the happiness equivalent of getting a college degree or more than doubling your income.

Try setting an intention this week for yourself and finding the way you want to make a different that suits you most, in this week’s Weekly Intention Guide.

JOIN THE DISCUSSION- Do you have a story of a stranger helping you? 

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