Tag Archives: gratitude journal

10-Day Re-boot: Crystal’s Day 3

crystal

by Crystal Tidmore

This morning I started off with a hot cup of DandyBlend Tea (kinda img_0974like coffee). My stomach doesn’t appreciate hot lemon water in the morning, so I opt for Dandy each day instead. For breakfast, I made one of my favorite smoothies with coconut water, spinach, banana, frozen blueberries and strawberries, and Hemp protein powder.

For a pre-workout snack, I pulled out my handy img_0978Trader Joe’s chopped salad (about 1/2 cup of package, apple cider vinegar, pumpkin seeds and avocado tzaziki dip that my husband had made for the Super Bowl (Reboot and Whole 30 compliant recipe that’s delicious!). I enjoyed a nice walk to the gym for a weight workout and luckily avoided the rain on my walk home.

Soon I was ready for lunch, and since I needed some post-workout energy, I sautéed some butternut squash “noodles” with onion, garlic and olive oil and tossed in some arugula and topped it all off with a few slices of avocado. With lunch, I made a cup of Detox Tea which is a favorite I have during Reboots.

img_0981Later in the day when my kids came home from school and were raiding the pantry and frig for snacks, I enjoyed a few dried dates along with my go-to cleansing juice like “Tigerlilly” at Juiceland: kale, spinach, parsley, celery and cucumber. I usually make a big batch that will last me 2 days. These great juice bottles come from People’s Pharmacy, so I re-use them quite a bit.

For dinner, I wanted a very light vegetarian meal because I had consumed a lot of red meat over the weekend. Into the oven at 450 img_0982degrees went brussel sprouts, onions, asparagus, mushrooms and green beans. It was exactly what I needed! And I drank tons and tons of cranberry cocktail all through the day. When it was time for bed, I felt good about the foods I had eaten during the day. I think I’ll add more protein into my diet tomorrow for more consistent energy. Loved having a light dinner and tea though. Just what my body needed!

Aspects of the Reboot I’ve found the most difficult: Technology turn-off is clearly an issue for me. I can’t seem to shut down at night. Tonight I’m going to try a guided meditation instead of frantically working on my laptop before bedtime.

Aspects of the Re-boot I’ve enjoyed the most: I’ve really taken Dr. Bomben’s message to heart about trying to add in little things that can make a big impact over time. For example, today I walked to the gym instead of driving there. Also, I walked to the restaurant where I was meeting a friend for lunch. Usually I would just hop in the car without thinking twice, but now I’m looking for ways to increase my activity outside of my usual workouts.

A couple things I’ve learned about myself over the Reboot: Like Amy shared yesterday, I’m also pretty hard on myself. I’m noticing more and more the importance of accepting myself and loving myself…and making sure my children see this self-acceptance and self-love. What kind of message am I sending to my kids if I’m always so hard on myself? I want my kids to see that I’m making positive and healthy decisions for long-term health and wellness.
The parts that I have incorporated into my life: For the most part, I am trying to prepare healthy meals for the entire family…not just for me and my husband during a Reboot. It’s so important to me to offer healthy eating options for my family so we feel our best. Knowing the foods that don’t serve me well (dairy, gluten) is a powerful tool, because each day I get to choose if I’m going to fuel my body with what gives me energy or depletes my energy. I also have the choice to indulge every now and then, fully aware that my body may not react especially well, but I can way the consequences (i.e. having birthday cake because I want to celebrate with my family!)
Spiritual aspect I’ve enjoyed: During this Reboot, I am focusing on a daily gratitude journal where I write 3 things I’m grateful for each day. Eating clean has helped me gain clarity and with this clarity comes much appreciation for the blessings that are in front of me, like my family, my friendships, and my community.

Advertisements

10-Day Reboot: Amy’s Day 2

Amy Casual headshot

by Amy Chibib

Super Bowl Sunday! Lets the Re-Boot Begin!

blob-3This was my first official day to commit myself to the challenge. I started the day with the warm lemon water and Apple Cider Vinegar. It definitely helps get me going without the caffeine. I am enjoying the Dandy Blend which is the closest thing I have found to a coffee replacement! My go-to smoothie is what I started the day with and it keeps me going all morning – Blueberries, Kale/Spinach, coconut milk, almond butter & Vega protein powder.

blob-2I did feel a slight headache, but as I kept moving and went for a run around Town Lake, the sluggish feeling went away! I was re-energized after the run and was excited to experiment with some new appetizers I was preparing for the Super Bowl game.

 

 

blob-1My game time meal and appetizers included: Roasted Veggies – These were delicious and a perfect snack! I cut up cauliflower, broccoli, beets, mixed colored carrots, and kale then sprinkled with a little olive oil, salt/pepper, garlic & turmeric. I placed in the oven to roast. Super easy and even my teenage boys were enjoying it! Mushroom caps – stuffed with Italian turkey sausage and sauerkraut. These were simple and delicious baked in the oven – without breading or cheese they were still yummy and satisfying. Raw veggies and olives with Hummus was simple and easy. Last, I made a big pot of homemade tortilla soup – sautéed chicken with onions, garlic, peppers, Rotel, vegetable broth and seasoning. It was warm and tasty! All this made for a Re-boot friendly evening! The only temptation was the brownies a Mom brought over for the boys – difficult to pass on those! It was a fun evening and I was still able to get to bed by 10:30 without checking my emails or social media!

It is still early in the Re-boot so my primary goal is staying off caffeine and chocolate! And continue to add in the self-care with more Epsom salt baths. Also, practicing the habit of journaling – noting what works for my body.

Aspects of the Reboot I’m looking forward to enjoying the most: The awareness, acceptance, slowing down and paying attention. Making notes about how I am feeling and a journal of what I’ve eaten. Since October, I have been working to combat a recent discovery that I have Hashimotos (Autoimmune) thyroid condition that had been giving my digestion some serious issues leading up to the Holidays. It is getting better and better the cleaner I eat. I hope to use this journaling to continue to learn more about what effects my body so that I will have sustainable energy and overall health!

Something I’ve learned about myself: I am hard on myself – I tend to be quick to criticize myself for not doing better. So I am learning to be kinder and gentler to myself!

Most difficult part: will be to continue to stay off coffee in the morning!

Quality of Sleep: I typically don’t have issues falling asleep – it is feeling energized and rested when I awake that I am looking forward to being more consistent with the healthier habits I incorporate.

blob-5Energy & Mood: Sunday was honestly my first committed day! It was a fun and busy day which helped and I realize how much the exercise helps to relieve missing the caffeine.

Spiritual Practice: This is a space that I find throughout my day! I usually end my day with a quick read of something inspiring and before getting out of bed in the morning say a few words of gratitude and appreciation for the day ahead!

Why Gratitude is the Best (and Only) Option

nov13_2016

Point to Ponder:
Who or what are you grateful for?

iGnite Neissa

by Neissa Brown Springmann

This summer, during our Banff, Canada iGnite Escape, each evening we found ourselves relaxing in the outdoor hot tub that overlooked the mountains while playing a get-to-know-you card game. One card with a random question would be chosen and each of us would have an opportunity to answer it. The questions were innocent, fun, thought-provoking and a great way to learn more about one another. A few examples of the questions were: “if you got a tattoo, what would you get and why?; if you could choose to be a different ethnicity, what would it be and why; and when feeling down or depressed, what do you do to boost your spirit? My answers were I’d get a cross tattoo, I’d be Brazilian, and when I feel down, I write gratitude notes.

Keeping a gratitude journal or writing gratitude notes are two of the greatest antidotes to the blues. Personally, they pull me outside of myself and allow me to shift my focus to a person or persons who I am thankful for as well as for the blessings in my life. And, while life stressors are intense and heavy, what we focus on is what shows up, so to me, focusing on who and what we are thankful for is the only viable option. Or, if you need more proof to the power of gratitude, check out the scientifically proven benefits of gratitude from a 2015 article from Psychology Today.

  1. Gratitude opens the door to more relationships. Not only does saying “thank you” constitute good manners, but showing appreciation can help you win new friends, according to a 2014 study published in Emotion. The study found that thanking a new acquaintance makes them more likely to seek an ongoing relationship. So whether you thank a stranger for holding the door or send a thank-you note to that colleague who helped you with a project, acknowledging other people’s contributions can lead to new opportunities.
  2. Gratitude improves physical health. Grateful people experience fewer aches and pains and report feeling healthier than other people, according to a 2012 study published in Personality and Individual Differences. Not surprisingly, grateful people are also more likely to take care of their health. They exercise more often and are more likely to attend regular check-ups, which is likely to contribute to further longevity.
  3. Gratitude improves psychological health. Gratitude reduces a multitude of toxic emotions, from envy and resentment to frustration and regret. Robert Emmons, a leading gratitude researcher, has conducted multiple studies on the link between gratitude and well-being. His research confirms that gratitude effectively increases happiness and reduces depression.
  4. Gratitude enhances empathy and reduces aggression. Grateful people are more likely to behave in a prosocial manner, even when others behave less kindly, according to a 2012 study by the University of Kentucky. Study participants who ranked higher on gratitude scales were less likely to retaliate against others, even when given negative feedback. They experienced more sensitivity and empathy toward other people and a decreased desire to seek revenge.
  5. Grateful people sleep better. Writing in a gratitude journal improves sleep, according to a 2011 study published in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being. Spend just 15 minutes jotting down a few grateful sentiments before bed, and you may sleep better and longer.
  6. Gratitude improves self-esteem. A 2014 study published in the Journal of Applied Sport Psychology found that gratitude increased athletes’ self-esteem, an essential component to optimal performance. Other studies have shown that gratitude reduces social comparisons. Rather than becoming resentful toward people who have more money or better jobs—a major factor in reduced self-esteem—grateful people are able to appreciate other people’s accomplishments.
  7. Gratitude increases mental strength. For years, research has shown gratitude not only reduces stress, but it may also play a major role in overcoming trauma. A 2006 study published in Behavior Research and Therapy found that Vietnam War veterans with higher levels of gratitude experienced lower rates of post-traumatic stress disorder. A 2003 study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology found that gratitude was a major contributor to resilience following the terrorist attacks on September 11. Recognizing all that you have to be thankful for —even during the worst times—fosters resilience.

iGnite believes in gratitude- living in and with it as well as expressing it. As a result, over the past four years and during the week before Thanksgiving, in all of our classes we have provided gratitude note cards for our members to write to anyone they want. As a result of our feel-good gratitude initiative, iGnite has mailed over 1200 gratitude notes that are delivered during the week of Thanksgiving, and after this week, we hope to make that number at least 1500.

Throughout this week, you will be given the opportunity to write a gratitude note or notes to anyone you’d like. All you need to do is have their addresses and we will make sure they have postage and are mailed by next Monday and received the week of Thanksgiving. If you can’t make it to class, I invite you to join our important and impactful gratitude initiative. Not only will your effort and words lift you up, but they will for sure lift up the receiver, and therefore the butterfly effect, the concept that small causes can have large effects, begins.


Action Item:
Use this week, the week before Thanksgiving, to write gratitude notes to those who you are grateful for.


You May Also Like:

A Simple Way to Live a More Thankful Life: Start a Gratitude Journal

Gratitude Journal

Better sleep, fewer symptoms of illness, and increased happiness are just a few of the impressive benefits that studies have traced to the simple act of writing down the things for which we are grateful. Research shows that translating thoughts into concrete language—whether oral or written—has advantages over just thinking the thoughts: it makes us more aware of them, deepening their emotional impact.

Keeping a gratitude journal is simple because there is no one “right way” to do it. Just keep in mind these research-based tips from UC Berkeley and you’ll be on the path to reaping the greatest rewards from the process:

  • Don’t overdo it. Writing occasionally (once or twice per week) is more beneficial than daily journaling.
  • Get personal. Focusing on people to whom you are grateful has more of an impact than focusing on things for which you are grateful.
  • Go for depth over breadth. Elaborating in detail about a particular thing for which you’re grateful carries more benefits than a superficial list of many things.
  • Savor surprises. Try to record events that were unexpected or surprising, as these tend to elicit stronger levels of gratitude.

It doesn’t matter what time of day that you write, the quality of your spelling and grammar, or how pretty your journal is. The most important thing is to establish the habit of paying attention to gratitude-inspiring events.

…when will you begin?

Source: University of California at Berkeley: The Greater Good

Leave a comment